Ethics


Honesty, responsibility, accuracy and truth are the backbone of photojournalism’s code of ethics, in accordance with rights and obligations of journalists. These are detailed in documents such as the Charters of Munich or of the National Press Photographers’ Association.

Ethical Charter

The Charters lay out specifically that photojournalists are expected to:

 

1. Respect Truth, whatever the consequences for himself/herself.
2. Verify sources
3. Only publish information that can ce traced back to its origin
4. Abstain from using any disloyal means to achieve photographs
5. Never pay sources or subjects
6. Treat subjects with respect and dignity and abstain from intruding on private moments of grief unless there is a justifiable and pressing reason for their public disclosure.
7. Never interfere with an event or attempt to change its course
8. Never set up or re-enacted a situation
9. Always write truthful captions.
10. Share with the editor all information he/she has, in order to avoid misinterpretations or wrongful use.
11. Choose publications with care to avoid any editorial misuse.

Digital doctoring

Today’s digital technology makes it possible possible to manipulate images.

The only manipulations acceptable in photojournalism are those that are used in darkrooms, in so far as they abide by the basic rules that ban.

 

What counts as manipulation

These pictures are by Eric Bouvet, who gave us permission to modify them in order to show examples of forbidden manipulations.

Original image

What you shouldn't do

Do not add, remove, rearrange or flip things or people in the image.

Original image

What you shouldn't do

Do not modify colors.

Original image

What you shouldn't do

Do not crop a picture by deleting elements.

Original image

What you shouldn't do

Do not heighten the density, contrast or saturation for the purpose of removing elements or people, or over-dramatize a situation.